A Little Shot of Wisdom

Adult Immunizations Save Lives

Immunizations have saved countless lives and have helped keep children and adults healthy. Infectious diseases controlled in the United States as a result of regular vaccines include polio, measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), pertussis (whooping cough), tetanus and diphtheria. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, most childhood vaccines are 90 to 99 percent effective in preventing disease, and if a vaccinated child does get the disease, the symptoms are usually much less serious than in a child who hasn’t been vaccinated. People with specific health problems may need to avoid or postpone getting some vaccines; it is best to consult a physician in these rare circumstances.

As adults, we have a tendency to forget about the importance of our own vaccinations. We “forget” due to the demands of our everyday lives or simply because we have an aversion to shots. Unfortunately, for some adults, the only reminders we have are when it is too late and we have already contracted a serious illness or when a loved one unexpectedly succumbs to a preventable condition.

Many adults are not informed about to the need to stay current on vaccinations. Even if you were vaccinated as a child, you may still need to get re-vaccinated because some immunizations cease to protect you over time. Other factors such as age and lifestyle can also put you at risk for certain health conditions. The following schedule is a guideline as to what vaccinations you may need at certain points in your adult life.

 

*Adult Immunization Schedule:

Adults in their 20s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine — Yearly

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine – Up to age 26

Meningococcal Vaccine – Discuss with your doctor or nurse if you are a college student or military recruit.

 

Adults in their 30s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine – Yearly

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine – if series is incomplete

Meningococcal Vaccine – Discuss with your doctor or nurse if you are a college student or military recruit.

 

Adults in their 40s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine – Yearly

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

 

Adults in their 50s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine – Yearly

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

 

Adults in their 60s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine – Yearly

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

Pneumococcal Vaccine – One time only

Herpes Zoster Vaccine – (to prevent shingles) – One time only

 

Adults in their 70s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine – YearlyImmunizations have saved countless lives and have helped keep children and adults healthy. Infectious diseases controlled in the United States as a result of regular vaccines include polio, measles, mumps, rubella (German measles), pertussis (whooping cough), tetanus and diphtheria. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, most childhood vaccines are 90 to 99 percent effective in preventing disease, and if a vaccinated child does get the disease, the symptoms are usually much less serious than in a child who hasn’t been vaccinated. People with specific health problems may need to avoid or postpone getting some vaccines; it is best to consult a physician in these rare circumstances.

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

Pneumococcal Vaccine – One time only

Herpes Zoster vaccine – (to prevent shingles) – One time only

 

Adults in their 80s

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine – Yearly

Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis Booster Vaccine – Every 10 years

Pneumococcal Vaccine – One time only

Herpes Zoster Vaccine – (to prevent shingles) – One time only

 

Adults above 90

Check your physician’s recommendations

Keeping track of your immunization record is an important step in making sure you are protected from any unforeseen illnesses down the road. It can also help minimize any hassles should you need access to it at a moment’s notice. If you are unsure as to where to obtain your records, it is always best to begin with your physician’s office.

*Some information provided from the Personal Health Guide and Body/Mind Monthly product copyrighted by Aegis Health Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

For more information on immunizations or to find a physician who can provide them for you and your family, visit StLukes-StL.com.